MEDICAL TEMP STAFFING LLC.
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WHY MEDICAL TEMP STAFFING ?


Hi,  My name is Tanya Marshall (RT)(R)(M)(RDMS)
I am the Owner/President of MTS.  I am A graduate of Midwestern State University with an associates degree in Radiology Technology & also degreed in Sonography from El Centro College. I will listen to a clients needs and do my best to fulfill those needs & search for the perfect fit for those needs in a timely maner.  We screen our staff members and personally interview them to ascertain their skill levels to make sure you are getting quality staff personnel. 


PROUDLY SERVING THE DALLAS FORT WORTH AREA, WITH 25 YEARS IN THE INDUSTRY











 
 STAFFING SOLUTIONS

Nursing Staff:
  • Registered Nurses (RN)
  • Liscensed Practical Nurses (LPN)
  • Liscensed Vocational Nurses (LVN)
  • Certified Nurses Assistants (CNA)
Allied Health Staff:
  • X-Ray Tech
  • Mammography
  • Sonographers
  • MRI Technologist
  • Vascular Techs
  • Radiation Therapy Techs
  • Nuclear Medicine Techs
  • Cath Lab Techs
  • Front Desk Help
  • Medical Assistants
  • Dental Assistants







 



LOCAL MEDICAL NEWS FEEDS

 
 

Newswise Top Picks: Medical Research

Newswise Top Picks: Medical Research

Newswise Top Picks from the latest research news

1 - New Study Finds 2.5 Million Basketball Injuries to High School Athletes in Six Seasons
2 - Pollutants from Coal-Burning Stoves Strongly Associated with Miscarriages in Mongolia
3 - Novel Compound Halts Cocaine Addiction and Relapse Behaviors
4 - New Target for Prostate Cancer Resistant to Anti-Hormone Therapies
5 - Following a Protein's Travel Inside Cells Is a Key to Improving Patient Monitoring and Drug Development
6 - Glaucoma Drug Helps Women with Blinding Disorder Linked to Obesity
7 - Bioinformatics Profiling Identifies a New Mammalian Clock Gene
8 - Depressed? Researchers Identify New Anti-Depressant Mechanisms, Therapeutic Approaches
9 - More Than Two-Thirds of Americans Support Mandated Coverage of Birth Control in Health Plans
10 - False-Positive Mammogram Anxiety has Limited Impact on Women's Well-Being
11 - New Tool Helps Doctors Better Predict, Prevent Deadly Respiratory Failure After Surgery, Multicenter Study Says
12 - Sleeping Away Infection: Penn Researchers Find Link between Sleep and Immune Function in Fruitflies
13 - Safer Alternatives to Nonsteroidal Antinflamatory Pain Killers
14 - Death of Public Figures Provides Important Opportunities for Health Education
15 - "Chaperone" Compounds Offer New Approach to Alzheimer's Treatment
16 - Cancer Stem Cells Linked to Drug Resistance
17 - Financial Incentives Help Economically-Disadvantaged Pregnant Smokers Quit and Improve Fetal Growth
18 - New Study Connects Mutant Enzyme RECQ4 to Cancer's 'Warburg Effect'
19 - Dual Role: Key Cell Division Proteins Also Power Up Mitochondria
20 - Pocket-Sized Anthrax Detector AIDS Global Agriculture
21 - New MRSA Superbug Emerges in Brazil
22 - Mutant Protein in Muscle Linked to Neuromuscular Disorder
23 - UNC Researchers Develop Insights Into Proteins Linked to Cell Movement
24 - Fighting Neuroblastomas by Blocking Their DNA Replication, Repair
25 - Midwest Spring Snow Freezes Out Allergy Count
1 - New Study Finds 2.5 Million Basketball Injuries to High School Athletes in Six Seasons

Newswise imageBasketball is a popular high school sport in the United States with 1 million participants annually. A recently published study by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital is the first to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens.

4/23/2014 5:00:00 PM

2 - Pollutants from Coal-Burning Stoves Strongly Associated with Miscarriages in Mongolia

Newswise imageBurning coal for domestic heating may contribute to early fetal death according to a new study by experts from The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - the coldest capital city in the world.

4/23/2014 3:00:00 PM

3 - Novel Compound Halts Cocaine Addiction and Relapse Behaviors

Newswise imageA novel compound that targets an important brain receptor has a dramatic effect against a host of cocaine addiction behaviors, including relapse behavior, a University at Buffalo animal study has found.

4/23/2014 3:00:00 PM

4 - New Target for Prostate Cancer Resistant to Anti-Hormone Therapies

Newswise imageResearchers have found a new target that could remain sensitive even when prostate cancer becomes resistant to current treatments.

4/23/2014 2:00:00 PM

5 - Following a Protein's Travel Inside Cells Is a Key to Improving Patient Monitoring and Drug Development

Newswise imageVirginia Tech chemical engineer Chang Lu and his colleagues have used a National Science Foundation grant to develop a technique to detect subcellular location of a protein.

4/23/2014 9:00:00 AM

6 - Glaucoma Drug Helps Women with Blinding Disorder Linked to Obesity

Newswise imageAn inexpensive glaucoma drug, when added to a weight loss plan, can improve vision for women with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), according to a study funded by NEI. This disorder mostly affects young, overweight women. Vision loss and headaches are common symptoms.

4/22/2014 5:00:00 PM

7 - Bioinformatics Profiling Identifies a New Mammalian Clock Gene

Newswise imageOver 15 mammalian clock proteins have been identified, but researchers surmise there are more. Could big-data approaches help find them? To accelerate clock-gene discovery, the investigators used a computer-assisted approach to identify and rank candidate clock components, which they liken to online Netflix-like profiling of movie suggestions for customers. This approach found a new core clock gene, which the team named CHRONO.

4/22/2014 3:00:00 PM

8 - Depressed? Researchers Identify New Anti-Depressant Mechanisms, Therapeutic Approaches

Newswise imageResearchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression.

4/22/2014 2:00:00 PM

9 - More Than Two-Thirds of Americans Support Mandated Coverage of Birth Control in Health Plans

Newswise imageSupport higher among those who may be more likely to directly benefit from affordable birth control.

4/22/2014 12:15:00 PM

10 - False-Positive Mammogram Anxiety has Limited Impact on Women's Well-Being

Newswise imageDartmouth researchers have found that the anxiety experienced with a false-positive mammogram is temporary and does not negatively impact a woman's overall well-being. Their findings are reported in "Consequences of False-Positive Screening Mammograms," which was published online in the April 21, 2014 JAMA Internal Medicine

4/22/2014 9:00:00 AM

11 - New Tool Helps Doctors Better Predict, Prevent Deadly Respiratory Failure After Surgery, Multicenter Study Says

Newswise imageA new prediction tool can help doctors better identify patients who are at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery and therefore prevent the often deadly condition, suggest data from a large multi-center study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology.

4/22/2014 9:00:00 AM

12 - Sleeping Away Infection: Penn Researchers Find Link between Sleep and Immune Function in Fruitflies

Newswise imageWhen we get sick it feels natural to try to hasten our recovery by getting some extra shuteye. Researchers found that this response has a definite purpose, in fruitflies: enhancing immune system response and recovery to infection.

4/21/2014 5:00:00 PM

13 - Safer Alternatives to Nonsteroidal Antinflamatory Pain Killers

Newswise imageBuilding on previous work that showed that deleting an enzyme in the COX-2 pathway in a mouse model of heart disease slowed the development of atherosclerosis, researchers have now extended this observation by clarifying that the consequence of deleting the enzyme mPEGS-1 differs, depending on the cell type in which it is taken away. They are now working on ways to deliver inhibitors of mPGES-1 selectively to the macrophages.

4/21/2014 4:00:00 PM

14 - Death of Public Figures Provides Important Opportunities for Health Education

Newswise imageAn Indiana U. study of reactions to Apple co-founder Steve Jobs' death suggests a critical window after a public figure dies to disseminate information about disease prevention and detection.

4/21/2014 12:45:00 PM

15 - "Chaperone" Compounds Offer New Approach to Alzheimer's Treatment

Newswise imageA team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's.

4/20/2014 2:00:00 PM

16 - Cancer Stem Cells Linked to Drug Resistance

Newswise imageMost drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a biomarker called CD61 on the surface of drug-resistant tumors that appears responsible for inducing tumor metastasis by enhancing the stem cell-like properties of cancer cells.

4/20/2014 2:00:00 PM

17 - Financial Incentives Help Economically-Disadvantaged Pregnant Smokers Quit and Improve Fetal Growth

Newswise imageSmoking prevalence varies by socioeconomic status - particularly in terms of educational attainment - making smoking during pregnancy more common among economically-disadvantaged women, who face an increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes, including miscarriage, preterm birth, SIDS, and later adverse effects. Recent findings from the University of Vermont demonstrate that providing incentives more than doubled smoking abstinence rates during pregnancy and increased fetal growth.

4/19/2014 3:05:00 PM

18 - New Study Connects Mutant Enzyme RECQ4 to Cancer's 'Warburg Effect'

Newswise imageNew City of Hope study finds that a cancer-prone mutation of the gene RECQ4 causes its corresponding enzyme, RECQ4, to accumulate in the mitochondria. This can cause mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly explaining cancer's "Warburg effect" of preferring lactic acid fermentation over aerobic respiration to generate energy.

4/17/2014 4:00:00 PM

19 - Dual Role: Key Cell Division Proteins Also Power Up Mitochondria

Newswise imageAn international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process. This is the first time the complex has been shown to perform both jobs. This newfound ability could make cyclin B1/Cdk1 an excellent target to control cellular energy production, potentially advancing cancer care and regenerative medicine. The research was published online today in the journal Developmental Cell.

4/17/2014 1:00:00 PM

20 - Pocket-Sized Anthrax Detector AIDS Global Agriculture

Newswise imageA credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge developed at Sandia National Laboratories and recently licensed to a small business makes testing safer, easier, faster and cheaper.

4/17/2014 12:00:00 PM

21 - New MRSA Superbug Emerges in Brazil

Newswise imageAn international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

4/17/2014 7:00:00 AM

22 - Mutant Protein in Muscle Linked to Neuromuscular Disorder

Newswise imageSpinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. In a new study published in the April 16, 2014 online issue of Neuron, a team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say novel mouse studies indicate that mutant protein levels in muscle cells are fundamentally involved in SBMA, suggesting an alternative and promising new avenue of treatment.

4/16/2014 3:00:00 PM

23 - UNC Researchers Develop Insights Into Proteins Linked to Cell Movement

Newswise imageCell movement plays an important role in a host of biological functions from embryonic development to repairing wounded tissue. It also enables cancer cells to break free from their sites of origin and migrate throughout the body.

4/16/2014 2:15:00 PM

24 - Fighting Neuroblastomas by Blocking Their DNA Replication, Repair

Newswise imagePCNA is a protein essential to DNA repair and replication, and City of Hope researchers are targeting it in neuroblastoma cells in order to halt tumor growth and induce cell death.

4/15/2014 8:00:00 PM

25 - Midwest Spring Snow Freezes Out Allergy Count

Newswise imageMidwesterners will have to sniffle through the day for the first time in the history of allergy reporting season as a spring snow storm freezes the scientific equipment used to create the Gottlieb Allergy Count, the official allergy count of the Midwest.

4/15/2014 3:00:00 PM